Arthur Homeshaw

Arthur Homeshaw was a Westcountry artist whose work tapped into the deep-rooted influence that represent the best in British art. These perspectives are discernible in both his linocuts and his pastels. Furthermore, his work displays an imagination that is both exuberant yet introverted and at times secretive. This paradoxical quality infuses all his work.

He developed a stylised manner of rendering reality which explored the land and the sea as many of the best English artists have done. This style is delivered with a constant delight that is barely concealed in his work. It consists of the striking use of bold tonal contrasts and complex patterning. There are also bubbling textures redolent of Samuel Palmer’s work (1805 – 1881). Arthur Homeshaw’s work can be placed in the English romantic tradition of Paul Nash (1889 – 1946) and his work also reveals the influence of the wood engravings of Eric Ravilious (1903 – 1942).

The power of his images was the product of a reputation that had been established over fifty years of artistic endeavour. He was a member of the Royal West of England Academy from 1964 and in his last exhibition there in 2010, he was a senior member of the Academy.

Arthur Homeshaw’s work has been purchased by the Victoria & Albert Museum. (Dockside Terraces) In addition, his linocuts were selected for the Summer Exhibition at the Royal Academy in 1964, 1984 and 1985.

In sum, we are presented with an artist whose vision of the Westcountry landscapes and seascapes underlined his deep attachment to the area. Arthur Homeshaw’s work, whether it is in the medium of linocuts or pastels represent a rare and unique talent.

His work is now highly collectible.

Exhibition Runs from 19th -29th April

 

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